Category Archives: Nutrition

Increase Nutrients While Managing your Calories

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calories

It’s probably safe to say that most of you realize the importance of managing calories. Eat too many calories and you’ll gain weight; restrict your calories and you’ll lose weight. Although this is technically true, we put much more emphasis on the types of calories verses the amount of calories when we teach our clients about healthful nutrition – and so should you.

Our mentality is that our bodies run by burning nutrients, not just calories. Nutrients are substances your body absorbs from the foods you eat to create energy.  You could eat 1200 empty calories and probably get through your day, but that doesn’t mean your body is getting the nutrients it needs to thrive, such as a balance of protein, fat, carbohydrates, and many vitamins and minerals. The list of nutrients you get from whole foods is almost endless in comparison to what you get in processed foods. For instance, two eggs and a banana have a better nutritional value than a typical bowl of cereal, even though they may have similar caloric values.

To maximize your nutrient intake while still keeping your calories in check, we recommend the following tips.

Choose foods that don’t have ingredient lists. That is, choose natural foods that haven’t been altered, like organic fruits, vegetables, nuts, and meat. These foods don’t have extensive labeling, because what you see is what you get.

Severely limit your intake of processed foods. These are the foods that have the long ingredient lists. Read carefully, and if you’re unfamiliar with any of the ingredients, find a different product. How can you take control of your health if you’re not even sure what you’re eating?

Eat a colorful diet. Pick foods that span the rainbow of colors to ensure a multitude of nutrients. The phytonutrients in fruits and vegetables such as sweet potatoes, blueberries, spinach, squash, and pomegranate diversify your nutrient uptake while still managing excess calories.

Eat fresh and in season. These types of foods have a greater nutrient density in comparison to frozen or canned foods and by changing your diet with the seasons, you also ensure variety. Don’t miss out on fresh corn on the cob or a ripe watermelon bursting with flavor this time of year.

Expand your cooking skills. What better way to confirm what you’re actually eating than by preparing it yourself. This allows you to incorporate more nutritious ingredients while avoiding unnecessary additives like sodium, trans fats, and artificial sweeteners. Cooking takes time, but it’s time well spent. If you become more proficient at cooking, you won’t have to rely on less than ideal options such as fast food or even skipping meals.

So take these ideas and learn how to incorporate them into your lifestyle. No matter if you’re looking for a fresh start or you just want to build on your current nutritional foundation, these tips will help to keep your health and weight in check.

Healthy Summer Cookout Tips

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grilling

Summer is here and cookouts are a common theme. Grilling can be healthy and tasty if you know which foods to choose and how to prepare them. The following tips will turn your next cookout into a healthy gathering that you can be proud to be a part of.

  • Practice portion control. Don’t let taste be the judge of how much food you eat. A serving of meat is about the size of the palm of your hand. A serving of fruits or vegetables is about the size of your fist, and anything else should be added to your plate in moderation.
  • Grill with quality cuts of meat such as fish, chicken, beef, and pork. Stay away from hot dogs and processed meat patties. Fresh meats taste better and also contain less sodium.
  • To get great flavor, learn how to prep your meats and vegetables. Marinades consisting of lemon juice and vinegar can really pull out great flavors from poultry or fish. Stick with dry rubs rather than sauces or syrups when preparing beef and pork. A good steak needs nothing more than some sea salt, pepper, and garlic to maximize flavor.
  • Use fresh organic fruits and vegetables to garnish burgers and tacos. Tomatoes, peppers, onions, romaine, olives, mushrooms, pineapple, and avocado add great flavor so there’s no need to drown out your food with ketchup or mayo.
  • When making tacos, use gluten free tortillas or soft corn tortillas. Avoid the hard shells that are deep fried in oils. Or better yet, make a taco salad.
  • Lose the buns. Many grilled foods don’t need to be sandwiched between two pieces of bread. Kabobs, steaks, fish, and chicken taste great with a side of grilled vegetables such as zucchini, peppers, or mushrooms, and a side of fresh fruit.
  • Be aware of excess liquid calories. Serve iced tea or water with lemon wedges instead of sodas or fruit drinks. If drinking alcohol, set a limit for yourself and drink plenty of water to avoid becoming dehydrated.
  • If having dessert, keep it simple. Avoid empty calorie sweets such as cookies, cake, or brownies, and stick to a fresh fruit salad with a dab of whipped cream or vanilla ice cream.
  • Plan to have activities such as volleyball or softball to keep everyone active and less likely to sit around and graze on leftover food.
  • Don’t be afraid to try new recipes. Hot dogs, baked beans, and coleslaw might be a traditional favorite, but mix it up. Break out of the norm and try something new!

So if you’re planning the next great cookout, give these tips a try. You can entertain and still feel good about setting a healthy example for your family and friends.

The Power of Herbs and Spices

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HERBS_SPICES

Often overlooked, yet an important component of nutrition, herbs and spices pack a big punch from a small package. They’re generally used to flavor food, but herbs and spices have many health benefits in addition to being taste enhancers.

Herbs and spices have been used for centuries as medicine to treat or alleviate symptoms of disease, so don’t underestimate their potency. Many have either anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, anti-microbial, anti-fungal, anti-bacterial, or antioxidant effects when consumed. This makes them ideal for helping to fight the signs of aging, cell deformities, infections, and even the common cold.

The following 5 herbs/spices are fairly common and easy to incorporate into a healthy diet.

Turmeric. This orange colored root contains curcumin, a substance shown to have anti-inflammatory and anti-carcinogenic effects. It has been used to help treat inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, allergies, and asthma. Studies have shown that it’s also a strong antioxidant in the fight against free radical damage and the destruction of healthy cells. Add a pinch of turmeric to your scrambled eggs or sprinkle it on a salad for a peppery kick.

Cinnamon. The benefits of cinnamon go far beyond its wonderful smell. Cinnamon has been shown to help regulate natural blood sugar levels and assist in the reduction of LDL cholesterol levels. Research has also shown that it can help reduce chronic inflammation of the nervous system which could help to alleviate symptoms of multiple schlerosis, altzheimers, and Parkinson’s disease. A dash of cinnamon tastes great in your morning coffee or added to a protein shake.

Ginger. This root is great in assisting proper digestion and boosting the immune system. Ginger can improve the absorption of nutrients by stimulating the pancreas to secrete key enzymes. It’s also effective in alleviating an upset stomach. Ginger has been used as a natural treatment for colds and flu and to break up mucous in the lungs. Slice a piece of ginger root and add it to your tea while it’s brewing for a tangy kick. Or add a piece of ginger root to your smoothie and blend well.

Rosemary. As a natural anti-inflammatory, rosemary may help with migraines, arthritis, and gout. It is also an immune booster and can aid in digestion. In addition, it contains the phytochemical carnosol, which studies show is a strong anti-carcinogenic compound that targets pathways associated with inflammation and cancer. Sprinkle some rosemary into your favorite potato dish or add fresh minced rosemary to a homemade marinade for chicken or salmon.

Sage. Sage is anti-fungal, anti-microbial, and anti-bacterial, so it can be used as an antiseptic to alleviate symptoms associated with sore throat, mouth sores, or cough. Sage has also been used to sharpen the mind and studies show it can even combat memory loss. Add a few fresh leaves to water and brew into a tea or sprinkle dried leaves into a stir fry dish.

So be sure to add more herbs and spices to your diet to support your health while making your food anything but boring.

Boost Your Immunity

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Immunity

Coming down with the flu or a cold is pretty common this time of year. Wouldn’t it be great to have the upper hand on seasonal illnesses? Although you might not be able to totally avoid getting sick, maintaining a resilient immune system may lessen the severity, duration, and frequency of illness.

The following tips are natural ways to boost your immune system and overall health:

Cut out offensive foods. Inflammation is a natural response to getting sick or injured. Your immune system sends inflammatory cells to the region they’re needed to attack and repair the compromised area. But, if you’re eating foods you’re intolerant to, your immune system may go on the attack every time you consume these foods. Besides causing added stress in the body, your immune system stays compromised for longer periods of time which decreases the effectiveness of daily maintenance.

Add more nutrients. Micronutrients such as magnesium, vitamin C, and vitamin D all have immunity boosting powers. Foods such as ginger, bee pollen, and many fruits and vegetables are loaded with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants which all aid in supporting a healthy immune system. Even adding lemon juice to your water can help alkalize the pH of your body and support healthy bacteria while making it difficult for acid-loving pathogens to thrive.

Improve your sleep. We all know how important sleep is to our mental health, but our body uses this time to repair and recover from daily wear and tear. A lack of sleep can lead to immune system suppression by increasing inflammation and decreasing the amount of disease fighting cells in our bodies.

Ensure proper detox. If your body isn’t eliminating everyday toxins from the food you eat or the air you breathe, you’ll have a hard time fighting off a cold. Proper detox begins with a healthy digestive system and adequate hydration sets the stage for efficient elimination. If you eat non-organic meats or if you had a recent dose of antibiotics, it’s a good idea to supplement with a quality probiotic to restore gut flora. This will aid in efficient digestion and keep things moving along properly.

Take advantage of strength training. Exercise has numerous benefits, but one that is often overlooked is the ability of muscle contractions to help drain the lymphatic system. The lymph system is a channel for toxins to be excreted from the body and a pathway for immune cells to travel where they are needed. Consistent muscle contractions drive the healthy flow of the lymph system.

Laugh and enjoy life. Obviously laughter seems to reduce stress in our lives, but it may also boost immune function. Studies have shown that laughter boosts natural killer cells that attack anything from infectious cells to tumor cells. Laughter will boost your body’s ability to destroy toxic cells and therefore lesson your chance for disease.

So take a few simple steps each day to give your immune system a fighting chance.

Go Organic in 2017

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Box with fruits and vegetables

The New Year has arrived, and for many people, it brings with it a new attitude towards diet and exercise. If you’re wondering which approach to take in 2017, don’t forget one of the most natural ways to stay healthy – eating organic.

According to the USDA, organic food is produced without: antibiotics, growth hormones, conventional pesticides, petroleum-based fertilizers or sewage sludge-based fertilizers, bioengineering, or ionizing radiation. Organic food does not contain antibiotics, hormones, chemical preservatives, pesticides, or any other added harsh chemicals. The controversial genetically modified organisms (GMO) are not present in 100% organic foods either. In other words, organic foods are foods in their natural state – which is the way nature intended food to be eaten.

Eating organic has many health benefits. Because much of our non-organic food is mass produced, chemicals and additives are used to increase production, including pesticides and growth hormones. These substances eventually end up in our bodies, and over time can disrupt our natural metabolic processes and cause toxicity. This could lead to weight gain, food allergies, digestive problems, headaches, and lack of energy. These chemicals were never intended for human consumption. Fortunately, organic foods do not contain any of these substances, so they fuel the body without the negative side effects.

Certain organic foods have actually been shown to be more nutritious than their non-organic counterparts. Most organic foods are in their natural state or minimally processed, so this

means less ‘filler’ ingredients and more of what your body needs. Organics contain more nutrients with fewer calories, which will leave you more satiated and aid in weight control.

Organic food production also benefits our environment. By eating organic, you are supporting natural farming methods, which minimize damage to our water, soil, and air, and to any animals involved.

So the benefits of eating organic may seem obvious, but the increased cost of organic foods can sometimes scare people away. This is where it comes down to the consumer to make the most sensible choice. Next to air and water, food is one of the most important substances we consume. Is it really worth cutting corners when it comes to the quality of the food that fuels your body? Many of our clients have realized that once they evaluate how they are spending their grocery money and cut out the unnecessary items, their grocery bill really isn’t much higher with organic foods.

So if you’re ready to make a positive change, give organic a try. Focusing more on the types of calories you’re eating is just as important as the number of calories. Take a look at the big picture and you’ll be on your way to a healthy year.

Habits For Keeping the Weight Off this Holiday Season

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healthy-turkey

With the holiday season approaching, it’s a great time to review the most successful habits that can help keep you on track when you’re surrounded by temptations from now through New Years. Regardless of what style of eating you consider healthy – food guide pyramid, low-carb, paleo – those who have mastered their dietary health share the following common practices. And you should too.

Visit the grocery store at least once a week. Healthy eating requires you to have nutritious food available. To do so, you may find yourself at the grocery store every few days restocking meats, fruits, and vegetables. Make a list of items you need before you go to the store and stick to the list. Buy most of your food from the perimeter of the store and stay out of the middle aisles as much as possible.

Use your kitchen. Do you spend more time in your kitchen or your living room? Start spending more time in the kitchen learning how to cook healthy meals. Now, there’s nothing wrong with a simple grilled chicken breast, but there are so many delicious options for healthy eating if you take the time to learn. Read a book, watch a video, take a class – whatever you do, make cooking a part of your day and you’ll be proud of your meals and have the peace of mind knowing exactly what’s in your food.

Prepare meals and snacks on a daily basis. Unless you work from home, you don’t have the convenience of stepping into your kitchen when it’s time to eat. Before you leave your house in the morning, make sure you have your food prepped for the day ahead. It could be something as simple as leftovers from last night’s dinner for your lunch and a yogurt and almonds for a snack. Use your kitchen as the hub from where your meals originate. This way you won’t be tempted to grab less desirable options such as fast food or skip a meal altogether.

Know your enemies. Healthy food for one person may be poison to another. Food allergies are very common and even if a food is healthy it may not agree with your body. If you have issues with gluten, dairy, or soy, those foods should not be a part of your diet, especially for the time being. This still leaves you with ample options, as long as you’re prepared ahead of time. If you notice unpleasant symptoms after eating certain foods, cut those foods out of your diet for a period of time and see if you feel better overall. If you want more definitive answers, your doctor can recommend a lab where a blood test can be performed to identify specific food allergens.

Eat for the right reasons. The main reason for eating in the first place is to nourish the body. This doesn’t mean you can’t enjoy your food, but eating purely for pleasure gets a lot of people into trouble with their weight and overall health. Build your meal around the benefit it will provide for your body and then you can get creative with combinations of foods, flavor, and preparation methods. Make a habit of including all three macronutrients in your meals – protein, fat, and carbohydrates.

Master these tips and you’ll be on your way to establishing healthy habits and building long-term success.

Is Your Food Causing You Stress?

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Tired young businessman in office

When you hear the word stress, what comes to mind? Your commute to work, paying all the bills this month, or trying to function on four hours of sleep. We all have a good understanding of what stress feels like and where it comes from, and many of us even practice techniques to manage that stress.

Other types of stress may not be as apparent or we just don’t recognize the signs.

For example, food can act as either an ideal fuel for the body or a poison that should be avoided. When you eat certain foods, they may be causing stress within your body – also known as inflammation. Inflammation is our body’s response to illness, injury, or stress. Inflammation can actually be beneficial when it’s short term. Sprain an ankle and it will become inflamed to begin the healing process. But, if inflammation is long-term and systemic, it could lead to many diseases and health problems.

Diseases associated with long-term systemic inflammation include cancer, heart disease, arthritis, and many auto-immune diseases. So it would seem logical to try to minimize or at least control inflammation.

Taking control of systemic inflammation begins with the digestive system. Changing the types of foods you eat will have a dramatic effect on the health of your digestive tract. Cutting out processed foods, sugary foods, chemical laden foods, and trans fats is a good place to start. Adding healthy fats such as fish oil while limiting certain plant oils such as soybean oil may help balance out your Omega 3 to Omega 6 fat ratio. Omega 3 fatty acids have a natural anti-inflammatory effect while too much Omega 6 fatty acids can have an inflammatory effect when consumed.

“Healthy” foods could also be causing inflammation if your body can’t tolerate them. Common food allergies include gluten, dairy, eggs, corn, soy, and nuts. These allergens could be causing un-needed stress on the body every time they’re consumed by causing your immune system to react. It’s almost as if your body thinks you’re sick every time you eat an intolerable food. If you think you may have a food allergy or intolerance, talk to your doctor. By taking a sample of your blood, a lab can determine if you have reactions to certain foods.

Imagine living life in a constant state of inflammation fundamentally caused by the foods you’re eating. Your body would be constantly stressed out. To put that in perspective, just think if you were mentally stressed all the time. Life wouldn’t be much fun would it?

So give your body a break from this stress by choosing foods that produce benefit rather than harm. You’ll have less stress, more energy, and live a longer and healthier life.

A quote by Dr. Ann Wigmore sums it up best – “The food you eat can either be the safest and most powerful form of medicine, or the slowest form of poison.”

Still the Most Important Meal of the Day

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Corn Flakes

We’ve all heard that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. It seems like such a logical concept – wake up, feed your body, and get on with your day. But, many people ‘don’t have time’ or ‘just aren’t hungry’ and either skip breakfast altogether or grab less than desirable options.

Here are 5 great reasons to eat breakfast every day.

Control blood sugar levels. By the time morning rolls around, your body has been without food for several hours. Depending on the time of your last meal, your blood sugar levels are on the lower end of the optimal range and need replenished before you become too active. If you skip breakfast your blood sugar will drop below the desirable range and negatively affect your health. Eat something high in sugar and you may temporarily feel energized but crash later. Avoid both scenarios by eating a complete meal that contains lean protein, healthy fats, and a natural carbohydrate.

Support metabolism. If you’re running on fumes until lunchtime, your body will slow down its own metabolism to conserve energy. When you do finally eat, your body is more likely to store calories in an attempt to make it to the next meal. This will slow down your metabolism, negatively affect your body composition, and eventually lead to weight gain.

Stay healthy. A daily dose of breakfast increases the amount of nutrients available to your body. Remember, our bodies don’t thrive on calories alone, but on the nutrients that make up those calories. Studies have shown that non-breakfast eaters are more likely to be malnourished than regular breakfast eaters. A malnourished body is more prone to injury and disease.

Feel better. No one likes feeling hungry for extended periods of time. This is what your cells feel like when you skip breakfast. They’re hungry, tired, and not very happy. But, by eating a balanced breakfast, you’ll recharge your cells and improve your energy, mood, mental clarity, and productivity.

Take a break. Breakfast is a perfect opportunity to relax for a few minutes before starting your busy day. So many times breakfast gets neglected because it doesn’t seem important at the time, or you scarf something down on your morning commute. Use breakfast as a chance to slow down and take a moment to do something good for yourself.

So what should you eat for breakfast? First, get out of the mindset that you have to eat ‘breakfast foods.’ A bowl of cereal or a breakfast bar everyday might be convenient, but it’s just not an ideal food. A cup of coffee might give you a boost, but by itself, it’s only a false sense of energy. Think in terms of pairing up a protein, fat, and carbohydrate from natural foods. How about leftover chicken and vegetables from last night’s dinner or a 2 egg omelet with spinach, tomatoes, and mushrooms, or a smoothie consisting of a banana, kale, blueberries, protein powder, and a scoop of almond butter. Put together a list of different options that work for you.

So take advantage of the most important meal of the day and feel the benefits.

Does Fat Make You Fat?

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Health Nutrition: Longevity Food

Most everyone would agree that the word fat does not conjure up good thoughts. Dietary fat seems to be the bad macronutrient that many people try to avoid. But, is fat such a bad thing?

The food we eat can be classified into three macronutrients – protein, carbohydrates, and fat. Furthermore, fat can be classified as saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, and trans fats. The different classifications come down to the molecular makeup of the fats, but for this article we’ll address the most practical differences between these four types of fats.

Most fats are a combination of saturated, monounsaturated, and or polyunsaturated, but we’ll classify them based on their most abundant component. Saturated fats are typically solid at room temperature and include dairy products, animal fats, coconut products, and palm oil. Monounsaturated fats include olive oil, nuts, and avocado. Polyunsaturated fats come from vegetable oils such as soy, sunflower, and corn, as well as fish and fish oils. And finally, trans fats are not derived from natural foods but are instead man-made and found in many processed foods.

So, which fats are the best? This is where things can get complicated, but our recommendations are always based on eating as natural as possible. With that being said, let’s get rid of trans fats before we go any further. They are not a natural part of the human diet so we recommend avoiding them altogether. Polyunsaturated fats are also found in many processed foods, and we recommend limiting these types of fats, such as soy and corn oils. However, we do recommend adding fish to your diet on a weekly basis as a great source of polyunsaturated fats. Monounsaturated fats such as olive oil and avocados are recommended daily, as well as a moderate consumption of natural saturated fats such as coconut oil and organic pasture-raised meats that contain some animal fat.

It’s worth noting that fats have a higher calorie content than protein or carbohydrates, 9 calories per gram vs. 4 calories per gram, so it’s important to limit your fats to still fall within your daily caloric needs. We recommend getting up to 35% of your daily calories from healthy fat sources.

Why are fats so important? First off, fats are an essential nutrient for the metabolic processes of our bodies, such as our ability to absorb nutrients and metabolize energy. Healthy fats support brain, skin, and joint health as well. Including fat with your meals will help you stay satiated longer by helping to control abrupt changes in blood sugar levels which is key for long-term health and weight loss. A recent study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that eating medium chain triglycerides, such as coconut oil, before your workout will increase fat oxidation during the workout. This means that consuming healthy fats will actually help you burn more body fat as a fuel source, therefore improving your overall body composition.

So learn to see healthy fats as an integral part of your diet and you’ll be one step closer to overall wellness.

Spring Clean Your Diet

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Box with fruits and vegetables

With spring finally here, it’s time to give your diet a thorough cleaning. Changing the types of foods you eat can help your body rid toxins and absorb new nutrients – giving your cells and systems a much needed recharge.

The first step is getting rid of ‘dirty’ foods. This list seems to be never-ending but includes most processed foods, fast foods, sugary foods and drinks, foods containing enriched flour, alcohol, and artificial sweeteners. Non-organic foods also contain chemicals that can slowly poison the body and put added stress on the liver, kidneys, and other vital organs. These foods make the body dirty by causing inflammation, digestive problems, inadequate detox, weight gain, dehydration, and lack of energy.

Once you throw out the dirty foods, you can bring in the ‘clean’ replacements. Eating more of these foods will actually aid in your body’s natural cleansing process. These clean foods include raw organic vegetables and fresh fruits, omega-3 fats, green tea, and filtered water. Organic foods provide valuable nutrients without all the unwanted chemical disruptors.

By eating more raw vegetables and fresh fruits you are increasing fiber intake and plant nutrients. Fiber will capture toxic particles in the body and improve bowel movements. Other foods like lemons, spinach, and olive oil will help to support a neutral pH balance. Maintaining a neutral pH will help minimize many problems that exist in an acidic body, such as fungus and bacterial growth, which could lead to allergies, fatigue, and even obesity.

Increasing your water intake will help flush your system of toxins and accelerate fat loss. A general recommendation is to drink at least half your body weight in ounces of water every day. So a 150 pound person should aim to take in around 75 ounces. This is much easier when you eliminate or minimize other fluids such as colas and juices and make water your beverage of choice.

All these factors will help your body do its job of absorbing the good and eliminating the bad. So make the effort to improve your body’s ability to keep itself clean and healthy. You’ll see and feel the difference!

 

PUSH RECOMMENDS

REMOVE

LIMIT

INCREASE

 

Fast Foods

Sugary Drinks

Sugary Foods

Gluten

Processed Foods

High Fructose Corn Syrup

Added Sugars

Artificial Sweeteners

Genetically Modified Foods

 

Non-Organics

Caffeine

Alcohol

 

 

Organics

Raw Vegetables

Lemons/Limes

Grapefruit

Berries

Garlic

Olive Oil

Green Tea

Filtered Water

 

 

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